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USA: "Japanese Auto Manufacturing Leading to U.S. Jobs & Economic Growth: Year-End Report Released"

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back to index backAMERItalk November,  2016


Looking to Canada to Satisfy Your Workforce Needs

With six out of 10 CIOs believing skills shortages will prevent their organizations from keeping up with the speed of change, the solution might be closer than expected. One needs only to look up.

With the growing importance of a high-skills workforce, companies are feeling the pressure to tap into the brightest and savviest talent before their competitors. Adding to this pressure is the fact that it is no longer only typical technology companies that are seeking engineers, data analysts, and the like. Technology is disrupting every industry — in fact, in a 2016 PwC survey, 78 percent of U.S. CEOs expressed concern about the speed of technological change in their industry.

Today, automakers are competing with technology companies like Apple and Google for the best autonomous vehicle technologies. Traditional defense contractors are competing with Silicon Valley giants and startups to advance in-demand technology ranging from data management to precision navigation and cybersecurity. Automation and big data are disrupting what we used to know about supply chain management and logistics.

The rate at which the competition is plucking up high-skills talent is startling. The 2016 State of the CIO survey found that 49 percent of chief information officers expect to experience IT skills shortages through the rest of 2016. Also, the Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey 2015 discovered that nearly six out of 10 CIOs believe skills shortages will prevent their organizations from keeping up with the speed of change. This represents a one third increase from just three years ago.

To succeed going forward, companies need to seek talent that is not just smart, but nimble and prepared for the next technological disruption. For this, companies need only to look to Canada. It is consistently ranked by publications, such as Forbes, as one of the best countries for business, and has led all G-7 countries in economic growth over the past decade (2006–2015).

Not only is Canada close to the U.S. geographically, but it is also familiar in culture and infrastructure. In addition, Canada continues to bolster its talent through further investments in education. So far, the results are impressive: Canada has the highest availability of qualified engineers in its labor force among G-7 countries, according to a survey conducted by the International Institute for Management Development (IMD). Canada’s largest province, Ontario, boasts the most highly educated talent pool among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), with 67 percent of its adults having attained a postsecondary-level education, such as a college degree. This is significantly higher than the U.S. (44 percent), UK (45 percent), Germany (36 percent), and Japan (47 percent).

Canada: A Familiar Face as Companies Brace for the Unfamiliar

Today, it is not enough to be book-smart — technology has drastically changed the traditional role of engineers. Now, they not only need to have traditional technical skills, but they must also (1) anticipate new technological advancements and adapt quickly, and (2) have interpersonal skills to understand organizational needs and communicate technical information to a non-technology audience.

To read entire article, please click here.

Source: Area Development
- GAI





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